Did you kill the song?

 

When you kill the bird, you kill the song. As it would be, when you kill the person’s spirit you kill the soul and their song.
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In this painting, “The Ravages of Greed and Power,” the artist
Eriberto Oriol seems to capture the characters’ pain and anguish of their dying souls.
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He hopes that these powerful characters startle people out of their daily routine and question the sanity of greed and power.
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Most of the time Eriberto does not want these faces to come in his paintings. He prefers that he could just paint without the psychological trips.
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Why do artists do this? El Greco felt that the spirits whispered madly in his ears. For artists like Francis Bacon and Edvard Munch, some felt that their disturbing paintings were a sign of madness and that these artists were completely off the wall.
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Eriberto feels it is a privilege to have the unique distinction of being an artist that allows him to see the world that is not always obvious.
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His dream is that the sky would get bluer, that the birds would start to sing again, and the glaciers stop melting.
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In Spanish we say, “El Sueno del artista, es que el cielo se vuelva mas azul, los pajaros comienzen a cantar de nuevo, y los glaciares dejen de derretirese.
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Text by Angelica
Painting by Eriberto Oriol
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Go to our Blog: ForbiddenArtLA.com to see artwork available.

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Who is Eriberto Oriol?

 Artist Eriberto Oriol

Mural size Painting 16'.6" x 6'

Mural size Painting 16′.6″ x 6′

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Artist Eriberto Oriol

By Angelica

There is a certain kind of freedom that comes from madness.  With civilization come the rules and regulations.  Who is really free? Who are the normal people; those who are free to act on their instincts and desires; or those who are ruled by regulations and expectations?

 

Artist, Eriberto Oriol, is not interested in following the rules and schools of art.  In his paintings and drawings, Eriberto speaks with his own voice.  Projecting his emotions through color, line and expression with more of an international flare from inspirations that comes from great art from Asia, Africa and Mesoamerica.
 
Like much of his work, in his drawing “Freaked Out,” it is a juxtaposition of color, line and shapes. The color pink in the background juxtaposed with the dark scribble of his main character, shows how bewildered and out of place this character seems to be.  He is in an urban setting that is almost frightening, as would be a large window cracking and breaking into pieces.
 
He has various styles in his art.  For him, is not about concept; it’s a pause to share feelings about common experiences. His characters are often missing the real structure of what is supposed to be a full body and often all you see are the souls and essence of emotions.  It’s hard for Eriberto to try to give meaning or interpretation to his work, as he just seems to be a vessel for these inspirations.
 
The shading in his drawings are not to give the drawings three dimension but it is just there for character and texture.
Born and raised in the United States he sometimes paints from themes that flow from memories, with various painting styles, impressions from his subconscious and experiences.  
To see list of art collector, details and other samples of Eriberto’s painting and drawing GO TO ForbiddenArtLA.com

 

"Reclining Figures"

“Reclining Figures”

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"Where is my Coffee?"

“Where is my Coffee?”

 

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STOREhttp://forbiddenartlacom.bigcartel.com

Published in:

Taschen  ♦ Hong Kong  ♦  Colon ♦ London ♦  Paris ♦ Tokyo ♦ Los Angeles

38 Timez ♦ Japan ♦ United States

Juxtapoz Magazine ♦ International

Eriberto’s also featured in the L A Times, LA Weekly and others

In an art review by top L A Times art critic, William Wilson called him a people’s aesthete.

L A WEEKLY named and featured Eriberto as a “Local Hero” for his work at the Pico House. 

 

GO TO MEDIA @  ForbiddenArtLA.com for listing of other publications.